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20121227
20121227
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
germany can win this year. it has been a while, and that would really boost our image. >> the titles in the europa and spanish leagues have often gone to spanish and english clubs, but they have also a a hig price. else is financially depen other premier league clubs have rackedndds of millions of euros in debt. european soccer's governing body is planning to level the playing field with financial fair playlet regulations. last week, as he issued a one- season than. most of the big stars and their cash in spain or england. >> in england, you already know the top for your clubs before the season starts, so full credit to hourly -- you already know the top four clubs. >> the league has been plagued by hooliganism, which has resulted in an empty stands. for years, the bundesliga has drawn the highest spectator numbers of any league in europe. combined with steadily rising television rights, they have made a solid foundation for german soccer. the only thing missing is that elusive european title. >> we hope they get it. if you are just joining us, you are watching the "journal" coming t
are as different as germany and greece. what is it that keeps the united states together? you had a great depression here in the 1930's. things were awful. and yet, i do not believe there were any political movements to get rid of the deficit states from the united states, like there are in europe and portugal and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. in the deficit regions. this is not philanthropy. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. you may recall that in the 1920s, internationally, we had a gold stand
processing firms are leading the recovery. >>> and germany's latest exports seems to be recession proof. it's a tradition dating back to the middle ages, but germany's christmas markets are more popular than ever. nbc's andy eckh artson sends this report. >> every december, music rix out across girlny's favorite christmas market. berlin alone hosts more than 80 markets, each with its own character where the sights, sounds and smells of christmas combine to keep your financial crisis at bay. >> we don't feel a crisis. when you look around here at the christmas market, you meet so different people from germany and it's so popular to come to berlin. christmas season is present season. >> over the past 20 years, germany's christmas markets have become a big attraction and big business. analysts estimate that the german christmas market industry brings in billions of dollars annually. for many small businesses and traditional craftsmen, the markets are the main source of income for the year. makia, one of only ten mammoth ivory carvers in germany has seen his annual turnover grow since 2003. eve
portions of germany, extending down through the alpine regions. some break in the action behind it but then the next system, a very large storm system is starting to move in off the atlantic toward the british isles. this will bring widespread rain showers. the problem here, the ground is already saturated. you have been seeing consistent rains recently so there is the risk of flooding. out ahead of it, though, things will be warming up. unseasonal temperatures are in store across london and paris, down through madrid at 12 degrees, over towards rome you're seeing a high of 15 but not everybody is sharing on the warm weather. stockholm, only minus 4 for your high on your friday. now here's a look at your extended forecast. >>> we'll be back in 30 minutes with more news. for all of us here at nhk world, thanks for joining us. have a great day wherever you are. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com
to germany and japan. an astonishing number. 70% of the profits in the country were recycled into europe and japan. the marshall plan is a very small target. i will not bore you with details. when they go to washington, it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollar rise, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. a period of immense stability very low inflation. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why is that? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism was sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. well, paul volcker -- been named may ring a bell. in 1971, paul volcker was an unknown working for another american. henry kissinger, who you may have heard of. before h
of 8 months to the next federal election in germany, for instance. greece therefore is the sick person europe. of the world. meanwhile, the united states of america is ungovernable. you have a system in this country that was created to create this country as an ungovernable state. you have congress, the president canceling each other out. how the president -- whoever the president might be -- do anything? you have china -- finding it impossible to provide a replacement for the demand that the west has done away with. so, i do not have an answer for your question. bewilderment. >> my question is about consumer demand and the extent to which the old system depended on it. if we do not have it to the same degree, could there possibly be a new economy? i cannot know how to say all of these in the right economic terms. i will say what i am thinking and see what you make out of it. its teams like all the economy's got to a point where it had to be based on growth. it could not just be sustainable. it had to grow. and that meant more consumers. so, then, that led to a lot of things ecological
partners such as germany, but understanding that things have to change. economist hardouvelis says greeks just need to believe that what's happening now really is leading toward a better future. >> once the depression stops and once the people start seeing the light at the end of the tunnel, then things will turn around. >> brown: is that your hope? or is it a forecast? >> i think in a year and a half we'll see stability. and the big question is whether the political system will be able to accommodate that period. >> brown: a year and a half more at best. small comfort for stelios karaglilanis and his family, facing the onset of winter-- it's too expensive to turn on the heat, he told us-- and a christmas unlike any he'd ever imagined. >> brown: there's more online from my reporting trip, including conversations with greek writers. find that on our poetry and art beat pages. >> warner: we return to our series of different voices and viewpoints on the nation's fiscal cliff debate. tea party activists took aim at government spending three years ago, with protests and rallies in washington a
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them. laws in the u.s. don't apply to a hacking group in germany, for example. >> talk about the bigger issue. cyber security in general, because as you know leon panetta said earlier this year the next pearl harbor might be through cyber warfare. >> yeah. >> is this something that at this point people recognize? is the problem getting worse or better? >> the potential for a major strike, this pearl harbor idea he's put out there, that is not hyperbole. this could be the most efficient ay for those who want to strike our government and society or any other because it doesn't require the physical manifestations of previous terrorism where you have to go disrupt infrastructure take over aircraft do physical destruction. you can stay in your own country, reach out for almost no cost, and deploy software that can bring down utilities, hospitals. worst of all, it could squirrel financial markets. i don't think anything is a higher risk than the ability of going after financial markets and subtly causing problems not turning out the lights on the nyse but jus
with mother nature in this way could have hugely negative consequences. russia 1.43 and germany, 1.41. at the very bottom of the list, other than certain countries where the information is not available, the bottom of this list was singapore at .78. i know we're dealing with so many issues nowadays and i blow a gasket over many of them, whether fiscal cliff, unfunded liabilities, at some point, growth is the answer. when you start considering where the engines of growth have been and what their population declines may be, it makes one wonder, where is the horsepower from global growth will come from and this at some point needs to affect the picks in your stock portfolio. back to you. >> rick, i'll take it from you, rick santelli. >>> even starbucks is worried about the fiscal cliff. and we'll take you live to one of those location as they launch their initiative. back in two. to live a better retirement. it's called a reverse mortgage. [ male announcer ] call right now to receive your free dvd and booklet with no obligation. it answers questions like how a reverse mortgage works,
installed bulbs on the new year's eve ball in times square. and in germany, an animal keeper holds a tomato frog in her hand. hot shots, pictures coming in from around the world. >>> the military puts tremendous time and resources into designing camouflage, and it could soon make them disappear. here's cnn's pentagon correspondent, chris lawrence. >> reporter: camouflage can be the difference between a soldier getting shot and going home. so a lot's riding on the next generation designed to outfit troops. it's only been eight years since the army spent $5 billion on m camo that critics say didn't fool anyone. soldiers complained to the paint where the army abandoned their one size fits all universal pattern. so they were looking for camouflage that they could use everywhere? >> correct. and it didn't work anywhere. >> reporter: guy cramer is one of the designers competing to win the army's next multi-million dollar contract. this summer, he showed us the science behind every shape, size, and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. so we're trying to trick the brainseeing t
on anyone? guest: the u.s. economy is still wobbly. southern europe is in a severe recession. germany and france are about to go in recession. when you have a shaky economy, piling on taxes does not work. spain's has been raising taxes. we have not seen anything like this with governments deliberately raising taxes on a scale since the early 1930's. they should be going in the opposite direction. they are putting more burdens on the private economies. host: somebody who may be in your income group wrote an op-ed about a month ago and this is part of it. i want to get your reaction. guest: in terms of income and what people effectively pay in tax rates, people and higher incomes pay effective tax rates three times those earning middle incomes in this country. salaried income versus capital gains gets confused. capital gains are no sure things. it is a high-risk proposition. there has always been a lower rate for capital gains. you would see this economy crater and hope of investment and go by the boards. bill clinton lowered the tax rates. to reverse that trend, that was a bad decade,
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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